This Feeling

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Live Review :: Max Pope :: The Waiting Room, London - Sep 17 2016




Live Review

Max Pope

The Waiting Room, London

September 17 2016

Words/Photos: Jess Sharrock

Max Pope, the 21-year-old South London (and Brighton)-based singer-songwriter, has been making creative waves on the new music scene for the past few years, from open mic nights to supporting names like Dan Croll and Declan McKenna and playing festivals such as The Great Escape and BST Hyde Park. His songs are filled with exciting indie riffs, smooth rhythms that are entwined with an interesting bluesy twist, along with his dreamy, soulful vocals and unforgettably sharp lyrics.

Tonight he brought all of that north of the Thames as he marked the end of his headline three-night London residency at The Waiting Room in Stoke Newington. The set was short, but sweet nonetheless; just over 30-minutes of charm and character consisting of songs including the emotive ‘Gone To Count Sheep’ (a song written about a difficult period between he and his step-brother Luke), and the 60s vibed ‘All That I Need’. Newer tracks ‘6am’, and the hooky and melodic ‘Rollercoaster’. With his winning personality and catchy songs resonating around the packed out basement room, he made his all-too-brief set a night to remember.


I first saw Max play by chance at The Old Queens Head in Islington last year, then a few months later at St Pancras Old Church, and each time I see him he just seems to get bigger and better. For the past year, I have been eagerly watching and waiting for new music, and hoping at some point, a debut album will be forthcoming. Although still waiting on that album, his ‘Less Than Nothing’ debut EP released earlier this year, is definitely worth a listen.

After being named on Spotify’s Playlist of Ones To Watch 2016 (along with Blossoms and Jack Garratt) and receiving support from Huw Stephens on Radio 1, Max is without a doubt an artist that many will be avidly watching in the coming years.

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